Rawmarsh library

Brief description

The present building dates from 1904, a fact noted on the commemorative plaque outside the front entrance. It is a traditional red brick building on the main Parkgate and Rawmarsh Road. Carnegie offered £3,000 to Rawmarsh Urban District Council in 1903, and a further £72 in 1906. The architect was Joseph Platts.

Current status: After closure (2011?), it was used as council offices, then news in 2016 confirmed plans to convert it to accommodation for ‘vulnerable young people’. (2017)

  • Year grant given (if known): 1903
  • Amount of grant: £3000
  • Year opened (and by who – if known): 5 June 1905

Photo of library today (2008):

geograph-799528-by-alan-murray-rust

From Geograph © Copyright Alan Murray-Rust and licensed for reuse under this Creative Commons Licence

Details:

Old photo of library (postcard):

Nothing in my collection yet

Visited?

Not yet

Web links:

Swinton library

Brief description

The library opened in 1906 and contained the living quarters for the librarian.  The design also incorporated a lecture room for educational purposes.  The library was re-modelled and re-furnished in 1932 (details and photos in the web link below).

Its use as a library was discontinued in 1990s when a new community library was opened in the shopping centre up the hill. ‘Carnegie House’ is now a series of flats. The florally embellished ‘Free Library’ lettering high up on the corner is still clearly seen.

Current status: Residential (2021)

  • Year grant given (if known):
  • Amount of grant: £3000
  • Year opened (and by who – if known): 25 June 1906 by Sir William Holland MP

Photo of library in 2005:

geograph-065546-by-george-middletonFrom geograph© Copyright George Middleton and licensed for reuse under this Creative Commons Licence

Old photo of library (postcard):

swinton

Visited?

Not yet

Web links:

  • Website: Swinton heritage society
  • Links to some of the apartments which can be rented (contain lots of photos): The Bronte apartment – in what was the reading room, the Shakespeare apartment, and the Austen apartment  – in what was part of the large conference room, in the rounded end of the building.