Bromley (Poplar) library

Brief description

The mayor of Poplar heard a speech by Andrew Carnegie in 1902 at the Guildhall, which included his offer to finance public libraries. He responded quickly, and within a  month it had been agreed that £15,000 would be provided for the erection of libraries at Bromley and Cubitt Town.The architects were Squire, Myers and Petch. This library is on the approach to the Blackwall Tunnel – now on a busy dual carriageway.

Awarded Grade II listing in 1973.

Current status: Not sure when it closed as a library. Now repurposed as offices (2021)

  • Year grant given (if known): 1902
  • Amount of grant: Part of the £15,000 provided for Bromley-by-Bow and Cubitt Town.
  • Year opened (and by who – if known): 1905

Photo of library in 2021 :

Old photo of library (postcard):

Nothing in my collection yet

Visited?

Driven past a number of times.

Web links:

Failsworth library

Brief description

The architects were Ernest Ogden and Percy Cartwright Hoy. The library was on Oldham Road.

“The library moved out of this building into a then modern building around the corner in the 60’s/70’s and the library was used as council offices for many years and became a bit dilapidated. Then about ten or fifteen years ago the council saw sense and it was refurbished, extended and they moved the library back in” (source – blog post linked below.)

Current status: Not sure when the library moved out again – but it is currently in the buildings next door to the original library, which were originally council offices. The library space is now offices. (2021)

  • Year grant given (if known):
  • Amount of grant: £3,000
  • Year opened (and by who – if known): 1909

Photo of library in 2020 :

Former library. Photo credit: Oriel Prizeman 2020. Image shared under CC license CC-BY-NC-SA 4.0 Cardiff University AHRC Shelf Life project

Old photo of library (postcard):

Nothing in my collection yet

Visited?

Not yet

Web links:

Salisbury library

Brief description

In 1903  Carnegie offered £4,000 toward the cost of a building. £1,000 was raised by public subscription to buy a site, and the building in Chipper Lane opened in 1905. The architect was Alfred Champney Bothams, in a style described as “free Cotswold Tudor-Jacobean”.

Awarded Grade II listing in 1972.

Current status: The library closed in 1975 (and moved to the Market House). the building has been refurbished, and is now called Old Library Chambers. It is currently used as offices by solicitors and accountants. (2020)

  • Year grant given (if known): 1903
  • Amount of grant: £4,000
  • Year opened (and by who – if known): 1905

Photo of library in 2020 :

Photo credit: Oriel Prizeman 2020. Image shared under CC license CC-BY-NC-SA 4.0 Cardiff University AHRC Shelf Life project

Details:

Old photo of library (postcard):

Nothing in my collection yet

Visited?

Not yet – although we did pop into the current library in Salisbury during a flying visit.

Web links:

Flint library

Brief description

The architect was John Welsh. The original building was opened in 1840 and was the Town Hall – (the Carnegie grant funded alterations to establish the library). A grand stone building, the Flint local history site shares the following information: “A free Library was established with a contribution of £200 from the Carnegie Trust. The library was formally opened in the Town Hall on 21st August 1903 by the Mayor Mr. T. W. Hughes. The librarian was Mr. E. J. Hughes.”

Awarded Grade II listing in 1972

Current status: Now offices (2021)

  • Year grant given (if known):
  • Amount of grant: £200
  • Year opened (and by who – if known): 21 Augutst 1903, by the Mayor, Mr T W Hughes

Photo of library in 2020 :

Photo credit: Oriel Prizeman 2020. Image shared under CC license CC-BY-NC-SA 4.0 Cardiff University AHRC Shelf Life project

Old photo of library (postcard):

Nothing in my collection yet

Visited?

Not yet

Web links:

Pemberton library, Wigan

Brief description

The architects were J. B. & W. Thornely. The library was built on a corner plot at the junction of Ormskirk and Ellsmere road, in the Edwardian Baroque style. Besides Carnegie, the Earl of Ellesmere was also a benefactor of the library

Awarded Grade II listing in 1999

Current status: No longer a public library, now used as offices (2017)

  • Year grant given (if known):
  • Amount of grant:
  • Year opened (and by who – if known): 1907

Photo of library today (2008):

geograph-1538985-by-Galatas

Photo © Galatas (cc-by-sa/2.0)

Details:

Old photo of library (postcard):

Nothing in my collection yet

Visited?

Not yet

Web links:

Hartlepool library

Brief description

The foundation stone was laid by HH Murray JP on 27 May 1903. The architect was H.C. Crummack, Borough Engineer. A house for the librarian was built next door. Robinson John Marshall was the original contractor.

Awarded Grade II listing in 1985

Current status: Library closed in 1999 (moved to a new site) and the building was converted to offices. Its official re-opening was on June 15 June 2006. It now houses part of Hartlepool Council’s Libraries staff and is also home to the Council’s Sports Development Team (2009)

  • Year grant given (if known):
  • Amount of grant:
  • Year opened (and by who – if known): 1903

Photo of library today (2014):

14103537642_38d424bddc_z

Photo credit: flickr user Tom Bastin (via cc licence)

Details:

Old photo of library (postcard):

Nothing in my collection yet

Visited?

Not yet

Web links:

Boston library

Brief description

Most towns received Carnegie grants that resulted in buildings either exclusively or primarily for the use of a library. However, this was not the case everywhere. Boston was granted funds by Carnegie that formed part of a much grander and more elaborate plan.

It had been originally intended to provide a Free Library and a School of Art to commemorate Queen Victoria’s Diamond Jubilee in 1897. A public subscription fund was inaugurated that was soon accepted by Boston Corporation. The Corporation had also committed itself to providing new accommodation for the Council offices and for the Police and Fire services, so these were included in the scheme. The result was the opening of the new Municipal Buildings in West Street which accommodated the Council Offices, Mayor’s Parlour, Fire Station, Police Station, Police Court and Cells and School of Art, as well as the Library and Reading Room. The Library was given exclusive use of its own designated rooms. Andrew Carnegie donated £560 towards the library scheme and the Mayor, Alderman Joseph Cooke, who  officially opened the premises, contributed a further £500.
[from the article by David Lambourne – see link below]

The architect was James Rowell.

Current status: No longer a public library – now offices.

  • Year grant given (if known):
  • Amount of grant: £560
  • Year opened: 16 June 1904, by  Alderman Joseph Cooke

Photo of library in 2020:

Boston – former library. Photo credit: Oriel Prizeman 2020. Image shared under CC license CC-BY-NC-SA 4.0 Cardiff University AHRC Shelf Life project

Old photo of library (postcard):

Nothing in my collection yet

Visited?

Not yet.

Web links:

  • David Lambourne wrote a series of short articles on Lincolnshire’s Carnegie libraries which were published in ‘Lincolnshire Past and Present

Tipton library

Brief description

The architect was George H Wenyon (who was also responsible for Dudley library).  A foundation stone is inscribed: “Erected by the Munificence of Andrew Carnegie Esq …..”.

Awarded Grade II listing in 1982

Current status: Closed as a public library in 2000. Refurbished and reopened as the Carnegie Centre in 2006 by Sandwell Council, it housed their Occupational Health unit until 2015, when they relocated to West Bromwich. Now the site is known as the Carnegie Building, and is offices for the Sandwell Leisure Trust (2021)

  • Year grant given (if known):
  • Amount of grant:
  • Year opened: 30 May 1905, by Councillor W. W. Doughty

Photo of library in 2009:

tipton-carnegie-geograph

Photo credit:  John M and licensed for reuse under this Creative Commons Licence

Details:

Old photo of library (postcard):

Nothing in my collection yet

Visited?

Not yet

Web links:

Monkwearmouth branch library, Sunderland

Brief description

Carnegie paid for 3 branch libraries in Sunderland: Hendon, Monkwearmouth and West Branch (Kayll Road library). All are built in red brick a similar style (Edwardian baroque) as each had to follow a basic plan produced by Sunderland librarian John Alfred Charlton Deas. Monkwearmouth branch was designed by Edward Cratney, of Wallsend and Sunderland. The site was the gift of JG Addison.

Awarded Grade II listing in 1994.

Current status: The library closed in 2013. The building was taken over by production company MCC Media  (2017). According to Shelflife project, in 2020 the building was empty.

  • Year grant given (if known):
  • Amount of grant: Total grant was £10,000 (originally for 2 branches, but they managed to stretch it to 3)
  • Year opened (and by who – if known): 21 October 1909, by Andrew Carnegie

Photo of library in 2020:

Photo credit: Oriel Prizeman 2020. Image shared under CC license CC-BY-NC-SA 4.0 Cardiff University AHRC Shelf Life project

Details:

Old photo of library (postcard):

Nothing in my collection yet

Visited?

Not yet

Web links:

Rawmarsh library

Brief description

The present building dates from 1904, a fact noted on the commemorative plaque outside the front entrance. It is a traditional red brick building on the main Parkgate and Rawmarsh Road. Carnegie offered £3,000 to Rawmarsh Urban District Council in 1903, and a further £72 in 1906. The architect was Joseph Platts.

Current status: After closure (2011?), it was used as council offices, then news in 2016 confirmed plans to convert it to accommodation for ‘vulnerable young people’. (2017)

  • Year grant given (if known): 1903
  • Amount of grant: £3000
  • Year opened (and by who – if known): 5 June 1905

Photo of library today (2008):

geograph-799528-by-alan-murray-rust

From Geograph © Copyright Alan Murray-Rust and licensed for reuse under this Creative Commons Licence

Details:

Old photo of library (postcard):

Nothing in my collection yet

Visited?

Not yet

Web links: