Pemberton library, Wigan

Brief description

The architects were J. B. & W. Thornely. The library was built on a corner plot at the junction of Ormskirk and Ellsmere road, in the Edwardian Baroque style.
Awarded Grade II listing in 1999

Current status: No longer a public library, now used as offices (2017)

  • Year grant given (if known):
  • Amount of grant:
  • Year opened (and by who – if known): 1907

Photo of library today (2008):

geograph-1538985-by-Galatas

Photo © Galatas (cc-by-sa/2.0)

Details:

Old photo of library (postcard):

Nothing in my collection yet

Visited?

Not yet

Web links:

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Worksop library

Brief description

The architects were: Haslam Son & Hollely (Gazetter of Public libraries) or Haslam, Son Holley (in the Historic England listing).

The Carnegie UK trust appears to have made several investments in this area. A suggestion made by a Worksop librarian to the trustees formed the basis of the idea of establishing one central depot for books to be supplied to villages in rural areas to reduce costs. In 1916 the trustees granted £800 to circulate books from Worksop to villages within a 10 mile radius.

In 1928 the library changed its name to Worksop Library and Museum but in 1932 the disastrous Worksop flood caused damage to the museum and it had to close. A new museum and library opened on Memorial Avenue in 1938 – where it stayed until 2010.

No mention in that article that the Trust had anything to do with the new library, but another article (about Canch Park) describes: …. the old Carnegie Library building, currently occupied by the Aurora Wellbeing Charity.

“This former Central Library and Museum, with its rotunda dome, now houses the premises of a well-being and cancer-related therapies charity, a teashop and a charity shop. The Carnegie Foundation-sponsored building by Hallam, Son Holley (sic), was opened in 1938 and closed in 2010”. [from geograph photo caption]

Awarded Grade II listing in 1990

Current status: No longer a public library, see above (2017)

  • Year grant given (if known):
  • Amount of grant:
  • Year opened (and by who – if known): 1938

Photo of library today (2016):

geograph-5110481-by-David-Hallam-Jones

© Copyright David Hallam-Jones and licensed for reuse under this Creative Commons Licence

Details:

Old photo of library (postcard):

Nothing in my collection yet

Visited?

Not yet

Web links:

Plymouth library

Brief description

Architects were Thornely and Rooke. On Wednesday 16 October 1907 the two foundation stones for Plymouth’s new Free Public Library and the Museum and Art Gallery were laid on a site on Tavistock Road (now North Hill). It was opened in 1910 in a dual ceremony with the City of Plymouth Museum and Art Gallery.

Damaged during the Blitz and subsequently restored.

Awarded Grade II listing in 1975

Current status: Closed as a public library, when a new one was created in a former commercial building in the centre of the city. Plans are to refurbish and reopen as a history centre. (2017)

    • Year grant given (if known):
    • Amount of grant:
    • Year opened (and by who – if known): 1910

 

Photo of library today (2014):

geograph-4493939-by-N-Chadwick

Photo © N Chadwick (cc-by-sa/2.0)

Details:

Old photo of library (postcard):

plymouth

Visited?

Not yet

Web links:

Nelson library

Brief description

Architects: J R Poyser and W B Savidge. From the listing: “an exuberant expression of Grand-Manner Baroque, with high quality carved stone detailing”. This library was designed as a closed access library in which books were selected through review of a catalogue and then retrieved by staff for the reader. It switched to an open access system in 1925 which permitted borrowers to browse the books.

Awarded Grade II listing in 2017

Current status: No longer a public library, it was closed in 1974. Used for a while as Pendle council offices, it was refurbished and put up for sale in 2013. From article below, it was sold in 2016 and is now houses a solicitors practice.

  • Year grant given (if known):
  • Amount of grant: £7,000
  • Year opened (and by who – if known): 1906

Photo of library today (2013):

geograph-2568359-by-robert-wade

© Copyright robert wade and licensed for reuse under this Creative Commons Licence

Details:

Old photo of library (postcard – from my collection):

nelson

Visited?

Not yet

Web links:

Didsbury library

Brief description

John Henry Price (city architect) was the architect of Didsbury Library, on Wilmslow Road and he described it as; ‘designed in the fifteenth century gothic style with tracery windows and emblems of Science, Knowledge, Literature, Music and Arts and Crafts in stone distributed over the building’. He also designed Chorlton library.

Awarded Grade II listing in 1974

Current status: Still open as a public library, run by Manchester city council (2017)

  • Year grant given (if known):
  • Amount of grant:
  • Year opened (and by who – if known): Saturday 15 May 1915

Photo of library today (2011):

2671116_aa80f706

Photo © Gerald England (cc-by-sa/2.0)

Details:

Old photo of library (postcard):

Nothing in my collection yet

Visited?

Not yet

Web links:

 

Stoke Newington library

Brief description

The main building was built in 1892, designed by Bridgman and Goss. It was extended 1904 by Sidney Goss with funding from Carnegie – adding a lecture hall and the children’s library. A later extension houses the war memorial.

Awarded Grade II listing in 2003

Current status: Still open as a public library, run by Hackney libraries (2017)

  • Year grant given (if known):
  • Amount of grant:
  • Year opened (and by who – if known): The extended building was opened 11 June 1904, by Councillor John Glass JP

Photo of library today (2017):

P1110009-forblog

Details:

P1110015-forblog

Old photo of library (postcard):

Nothing in my collection yet

Visited?

Yes, in June 2017.

Web links:

Sefton Park library

Brief description

Sefton Park, which was opened by AC himself, contained a children’s library, Liverpool’s first open access loan collection and an all-female staff (a tradition which is still maintained at this branch). It was designed by the city surveyor, Thomas Shelmerdine in the Tudor Revival style. Lots of interior details remain, including the simple art nouveau style railings around the gallery.

In the 1960s, a small flat roofed extension was added. This is now the children’s library (and not included in the listing!).

Awarded Grade II listing in 2012

Current status: Still open as a public library, run by Liverpool city council (2017)

  • Year grant given (if known):
  • Amount of grant: Liverpool received £40,000 in all – for 4 branches and 2 reading rooms. Sefton Park library cost £5,000
  • Year opened (and by who – if known): 3 August 1911, by Andrew Carnegie

Photo of library today:

34682084403_98bbd66aaf_z

Details:

P1110105

P1110117

Old photo of library (showing AC at the opening ceremony):

P1110118

Old photo of library (postcard):

Nothing in my collection yet

Visited?

Yes, in June 2017, on a visit to Liverpool which also took in Garston (another Carnegie legacy library), Kensington library, and Central library.

Web links: