Fenton library

Brief description

The site was gifted to the town by William Meath Baker (the Baker family owned a large pottery business in Fenton, and the street the library is on, is called Baker Street). The architect was F.R. Lawson.

Current status: Closed as a library in 2011, but see article linked below – plans are in hand to reopen. “Urban Vision’s plans also involve creating a community gallery, a specialist ‘built environment’ library, five units to be let out to small businesses and two meeting rooms.”

  • Year grant given (if known):
  • Amount of grant: £5,000
  • Year opened (and by who – if known): 1907

Photo of library today (2017):

fenton-stoke-forblog

Old photo of library (postcard):

Nothing in my collection yet

Visited?

Yes, during our holiday in the Peak District in August 2017. The library was still closed, but looks to be in good condition, and I was heartened to find the newspaper article listed below, which hints of a positive future.

Web links:

Thornaby on Tees library

Brief description

The original library opened in 1893 and was the gift of a local industrialist, Alderman T. Wrighton, MP. An extension was planned and in 1903, an offer of £1,000 was made by Andrew Carnegie, increased to £1,500 in 1904. This grant was obtained through the offices of Alderman William Whitwell, who was Carnegie’s predecessor in the Presidency of the Iron & Steel Institute. He was also the donor of the land for the extension, which took the form of a children’s library, and was opened in February 1905.

Current status: Closed – current situation/plans unknown.

  • Year grant given (if known): 1903, increased in 1904
  • Amount of grant: £1,500
  • Year opened (and by who – if known): February 1905

Photo of library today (2007):

geograph-319484-by-Mick-Garratt

Photo credit: Mick Garratt and licensed for reuse under this Creative Commons Licence

Details:

Old photo of library (postcard):

Nothing in my collection yet

Visited?

Not yet

Web links:

Thorne library

Brief description

The foundation stone was laid by James Servant, on 14 December 1903

Current status: Closed in 2007. Sold in 2010, current status unsure (2017)

  • Year grant given (if known):
  • Amount of grant:
  • Year opened (and by who – if known): 1905

Photo of library today (2010):

geograph-1743480-by-richard-croftPhoto credit: Richard Croft and licensed for reuse under this Creative Commons Licence

Details:

geograph-1743488-by-Richard-Croft

Photo credit: Richard Croft and licensed for reuse under this Creative Commons Licence

Old photo of library (postcard):

thorn

Visited?

Not yet

Web links:

  • Entry on Geograph (note, photo shows for sale sign, caption says ‘sold’)
  • National Archives: Plans of Thorne library (the record is a reference to plans stored in Doncaster archives)

Burley library

Brief description

Situated on Cardigan Road, this library was built in 1926. The library cost £8,338 to build, a large amount of this came from the Carnegie Trust. It is a simlar design to the libraries in Bramley and Compton Road.

Current status: Closed February 2016

  • Year grant given (if known):
  • Amount of grant: c£8,000
  • Year opened (and by who – if known): 15 June 1926, by Alderman Sir Percy Jackson, Chairman of the West Riding Education Committee.

Photo of library today (2007):

burley_library_cardigan_road_-_geograph-org-uk_-_446101

RichTea [CC BY-SA 2.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0)%5D, via Wikimedia Commons

Details:

Old photo of library (postcard):

Nothing in my collection yet

Visited?

Not yet

Web links:

Erith library

Brief description

In 1903 active local Members of the Council privately approached Andrew Carnegie. They succeeded in securing from him a donation of £7,000 provided that the Council raised a 1d rate (the maximum local tax then permitted by law to be used for public libraries) which produced an operating budget of £610 per annum.

The architect was W Egerton, who designed a building in the ‘Free Renaissance’ style.

The new Erith Library was opened in 1906 at Walnut Tree Road, and an early local guide proudly states that it contained “lending and reference libraries, news, magazines and children’s rooms, and lecture, committee and filing rooms. The first librarian was William Barton Young, who was killed in action in WWI.

The library has been re-modelled internally many times, the last complete re-fit being in the year 2000.

Awarded Grade II listing in 1996.

Current status: No longer a public library, not sure if the museum which used to share the building is still open. (2016)

  • Year grant given (if known): 1903
  • Amount of grant: £7,000
  • Year opened (and by who – if known): 7 April 1906, by Judge James Alexander Rentoul

Photo of library today (2006):

211028748_eed39d5bf5_z

Details:

erith-plaque

Old photo of library (postcard):

Nothing in my collection yet

Visited?

Yes, in 2006 – before it closed completely, although it wasn’t open the day we visited.

Web links and other references:

  • Entry on the listed buildings register
  • History of Erith museum
  • Details about this, and all libraries in Kent found in a 3 part article written by Martin Tapsell: The Hare and the Tortoise – some notable public library buildings in Kent,  published in Bygone Kent 2001-02.

East Greenwich library

Brief description

Designed by Sydney RJ Smith in a free Edwardian Baroque style.

Awarded Grade II listing in 1993

Current status: Closed in 2015.

  • Year grant given (if known):
  • Amount of grant:
  • Year opened (and by who – if known): 1905

Photo of library today (2006):

211022485_b3ebd96af7_z

Details:

eastgreenwich-plaque-crop

Old photo of library (postcard):

Nothing in my collection yet

Visited?

Yes – back in 2006 when it was still open.

Web links:

Tinsley library

Brief description

Andrew Carnegie offered £1,500 to Tinsley Urban District Council in 1903. The site was given by Earl Fitzwilliam, and the architects were Messrs Holmes & Walson of Sheffield. Designed in the renaissance style, it was faced in local pressed bricks and Grenoside stone dressings.

Current status: Boarded up when we visited in 2009, can’t find out what its current status is – if anyone local can let me know, please leave a comment (2016)

  • Year grant given (if known):
  • Amount of grant: £1,500
  • Year opened (and by who – if known): 8 June 1905

Photo of library today (2009):

3423806119_121dabf0c9_z

Details:

Old photo of library (postcard):

tinsley

Visited?

Yes, in 2009, when it was boarded up (having been a childrens centre)

Web links: