Northfield library

Brief description

Land was provided by the Cadbury brothers. The foundation stone was laid by Alderman T. R. Bayliss. On 12 February 1914, it was destroyed by a fire – with suspicion falling on the suffragettes. It was rebuilt, using the same facade.  In 1914, it became the first open-access lending library in Birmingham. In 1984, the library building was doubled in size.

Current status: Still open as a public library, run by Birmingham council (2017)

  • Year grant given (if known):
  • Amount of grant: £750
  • Year opened (and by who – if known): 1906

Photo of library today (2016):

26293766735_339a6a8121_z

Photo credit: Flickr user Ian (shared under cc licence)

Details:

Old photo of library (postcard):

Northfield_Free_Library

Image from wikipedia: part of an old photograph first published as a postcard by Edwards & Co., Edgbaston Street, Birmingham

Visited?

Not yet

Web links:

Advertisements

Rednal library

Brief description

The land was given by Messrs Edward and George Cadbury. The architect was Benjamin Bower, the building was designed in the arts and crafts style.

Awarded Grade II listing in 1982.

Current status: Library closed in the mid 1990s. Now a private house (2017)

  • Year grant given (if known):
  • Amount of grant:
  • Year opened (and by who – if known): 1909

Photo of library today (2017):

rednal2-zoe

Photo credit: Zoe – on this blog post

Details:

rednal-plaque-zoe-forblog

Photo credit: Zoe – on this blog post

Old photo of library (postcard):

Nothing in my collection yet

Visited?

Not yet

Web links:

Bartley Green library

Brief description

Celebrated its centenary on Wednesday 14 September 2005.

From an article in the Guardian (link below):” The tiny library at Bartley Green boasts two commemorative plaques on its walls. One pays tribute to the Scottish philanthropist Andrew Carnegie, who put up the money for the building; the other remembers Jane Bunford, who at 7ft 9in was the world’s tallest woman at the time of her death in 1922.”

Current status: Still open as a public library, run by Birmingham council (2017)

  • Year grant given (if known):
  • Amount of grant:
  • Year opened (and by who – if known): 1905

Photo of library today:

No free to use image traced yet.

Old photo of library (postcard):

Nothing in my collection yet

Visited?

Not yet

Web links:

Aston Cross library

Brief description

In 1903 when the Aston Manor Urban District Council was created, a site on the main road from Birmingham into Aston was chosen for Aston Cross Library. The building was a statement of the district’s new status. The land was donated by nearby Ansells Brewery and the building paid for by Carnegie.

Current status: No longer a public library, current status unknown, but maybe used as flats (2017)

  • Year grant given (if known):
  • Amount of grant:
  • Year opened (and by who – if known): 30 October 1903, by Alderman Edward Ansell

Photo of library today (2017):

astoncrosslibrary2-zoeblog

Photo credit: Zoe – on this blog post

Details:

astonlibrary7-zoeblog

Photo credit: Zoe – on this blog post

Old photo of library (postcard):

Nothing in my collection yet

Visited?

Not yet

Web links:

Kings Norton

Brief description

Built next to the Post Office in 1906. The foundation stone was laid by Councillor Edwin Shephard. The building was designed by Benjamin Bower, and built by Mr Jackson. It cost £1,000.

The library was enlarged in 1939.

Current status: Still open as a public library, run by Birmingham council. (2017)

  • Year grant given (if known):
  • Amount of grant:
  • Year opened (and by who – if known): August 1906

Photo of library today (2013):

kingsnorton-flickrPhoto by flickr user Elliott Brown (shared under cc licence)

Details:

Old photo of library (postcard):

Nothing in my collection yet

Visited?

Not yet

Web links:

Selly Oak library

Brief description

The architect was John P Osborne, and the building contractor was George Webb. The foundation stone was laid on 1 August 1905. [Exactly the same people, and timing, as the library in Stirchley] nb the listings entry says the building opened on 1 August 1905…..

Awarded Grade II listing in 2011

Current status: Still open as a public library, run by Birmingham council (2016)

  • Year grant given (if known): June 1902
  • Amount of grant: £3,000
  • Year opened (and by who – if known): 23 June 1906, by Thomas Gibbins (who donated the site).

Photo of library today (2009):

4206078447_99c4f71080_z

Photo credit: flickr user Elliott Brown, shared under cc licence

Details:

Old photo of library (postcard):

Nothing in my collection yet, but the image below appears in wikimedia:

selly_oak_free_library

Visited?

Not yet

Web links:

Kings Heath library

Brief description

The architect was Arthur Gilbey Latham, and his design was for a building in classic Renaissance style. It has a Baroque facade. The land was purchased by a public subscription. The foundation stone was laid in August 1905.

The library was extended in 1974, to house a childrens library.

Awarded Grade II listing in 2010.

Current status: Still open as a public library, run by Birmingham council (2016)

  • Year grant given (if known): 1902
  • Amount of grant: Carnegie gave £12,500 to King’s Norton and Northfield UDC for the erection of several libraries. Kings Heath was one of 8 to receive funding, and the library cost £3,368.
  • Year opened (and by who – if known): 1906

Photo of library today (2009):

4175354392_dbec729c67_z

Photo credit: flickr user Elliott Brown, shared under cc licence

Details:

Old photo of library (postcard):

kingsheath

Visited?

Not yet

Web links: