Northampton library

Brief description

The architect was Herbert Norman, and the builder was AA Clarke. It was one of the first libraries in the world to have a children’s library (opened in 1912). The library was refurbished in the 1960s and again in the 1980s. It was made a Grade II listed building in 1975.

Current status: Still the main town library.

  • Year grant given (if known):
  • Amount of grant: £15,000
  • Year opened (and by who – if known): 9 June 1910 by Alderman H Butterfield, Mayor of Northampton

Photo of library today:

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Exterior

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The Carnegie Room

Details:

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Note this is one of the Carnegie libraries to display a bust of the funder (top right) as part of the exterior decoration (others include Manor Park and Walthamstow)

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Old photo of library (postcard):

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Visited?

Visited several times 2015-17, related to Libraries Taskforce meetings – one time we held a Taskforce meeting actually in the Carnegie Room.

Web links:

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Taunton library

Brief description

Architects were A Colbourne Little and Ingleson C Goodison, and the builder was TH Moggridge.

Current status: The library closed in 1996, and it became a winebar/restaurant.

  • Year grant given (if known):
  • Amount of grant:
  • Foundation stone laid: 13 October 1904
  • Year opened: 24 August 1905 by the Mayor: Josiah Lewis

Photo of library today:

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Details:

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The brass plaque from the library which is now on the wall in the new one.

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Foundation stone still visible on the old library.

Old photo of library (postcard):

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Visited?

Found the old library in 2008 when returning from a holiday in Cornwall. Visited the new library in Taunton in April 2016, and saw the brass plaque

Web links:

Location 16 on Taunton Town Heritage Trail

Stoke library

Brief description

This branch is one of 3 (the other 2 are Earlsdon and Foleshill) built in Coventry as the stone says: “through the munificence of Andrew Carnegie”.

Stoke library is on a corner site with steep steps leading up to the front door.

Current status: Still a library

  • Year grant given (if known):
  • Amount of grant:
  • Year opened (and by who – if known): 1913

Photo of library today:

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Details:

Each of the 3 branch libraries in Coventry has the same wording on its stone (see the post for Foleshill for image). All say 2012, which I guess must be when the stone was laid, as all were opened in 2013 (as illustrated by the framed certificate which each received from the Carnegie UK Trust when they celebrated their centenary – again, see the Foleshill post for image)

Old photo of library (postcard):

Visited?

I visited all 3 branch libraries on 7 July 2016, following a meeting in Coventry central library. Each is instantly recognisable as they are built in similar styles, but each is also different. The insides have familiar layouts, and all are bright spaces, which when I visited were busy.

Web links:

Earlsdon library

Brief description

This branch is one of 3 (the other 2 are Foleshill and Stoke) built in Coventry as the stone says: “through the munificence of Andrew Carnegie”.

It was extended at some point into the site of the former electricity substation, which provided additional space for offices and a staffroom.

Current status: Still a library

  • Year grant given (if known):
  • Amount of grant:
  • Year opened (and by who – if known): 1913

Photo of library today:

earlsdon2-forblog

Details:

Each of the 3 branch libraries in Coventry has the same wording on its stone (see the post for Foleshill for image). All say 2012, which I guess must be when the stone was laid, as all were opened in 2013 (as illustrated by the framed certificate which each received from the Carnegie UK Trust when they celebrated their centenary – again, see the Foleshill post for image)

Old photo of library (postcard):

Visited?

I visited all 3 branch libraries on 7 July 2016, following a meeting in Coventry central library. Each is instantly recognisable as they are built in similar styles, but each is also different. The insides have familiar layouts, and all are bright spaces, which when I visited were busy.

Web links:

Foleshill library

Brief description

This branch is one of 3 (the other 2 are Earlsdon and Stoke) built in Coventry as the stone says: “through the munificence of Andrew Carnegie”

As detailed in the news article linked below, the library was damaged in an arson attack in 2003. It was fully restored and extended though, and reopened in 2005.

Current status: Still a library

  • Year grant given (if known):
  • Amount of grant:
  • Year opened (and by who – if known): 1913

Photo of library today:

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Details:

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Each of the 3 branch libraries in Coventry has the same wording on the stone. All say 2012, which I guess must be when the stone was laid, as all were opened in 2013 (as illustrated by the framed certificate below which each received from the Carnegie UK Trust when they celebrated their centenary)

foleshill6-forblog

Old photo of library (postcard):

Visited?

I visited all 3 branch libraries on 7 July 2016, following a meeting in Coventry central library. Each is instantly recognisable as they are built in similar styles, but each is also different. The insides have familiar layouts, and all are bright spaces, which when I visited were busy.

Web links:

Stafford library

Brief description

The former borough library of Stafford, originally known as the ‘New Free Library’, was designed by the Liverpool architects Briggs, Wolstenholme and Thornely in 1912 and extended in 1962 by the borough architect. It was partially funded by the charity of Andrew Carnegie, although apparently before the Carnegie United Kingdom Trust had been founded in 1913. Its foundation stone was laid by the Mayor of Stafford, Cllr. C W Miller on 19th February, 1913.

Current status? The building closed in 1998 when the library was moved into the centre of town, and initially became the Stafford Performing Arts centre. It was sold to a developer in 2011, but plans to turn it into a restaurant did not happen. When I saw it (2016) it was for sale.

  • Year grant given (if known):
  • Amount of grant:
  • Year opened (and by who – if known): 1914

Photo of library today:

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Visited?

Saw this building on 4 April 2016 – on the way to visit the new library, which is in the centre of town, about a 10 minute walk away.

Web links:

 

Levenshulme library

Brief description

The first brick was laid on 5 December 1903 and the library opened in 1904.

Current status: Closed in 2016 when the new Arcadia library and leisure centre opened in central Levenshulme. There are plans in preparation to develop the building into an arts and community centre.

  • Year grant given (if known):
  • Amount of grant:
  • Year opened (and by who – if known): 1904

Photo of library today:

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Detail:

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Old photo of library (postcard):

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Visited?

Visited on 13 April 2016 (after it had closed, so only saw the outside).

Web links: