Scunthorpe library

Brief description

In Scunthorpe itself there had been an earlier plan to build a Free Library and Council offices which had come to nothing, but, in August 1902, the Public Libraries’ Act was adopted and a library building erected in the old Station Road (now known as High Street East) through Carnegie’s generosity. The town surveyor, A.M. Cobban, produced the plans. The site, which, like the one in Ashby, was in a rather inconvenient position, was purchased through a gift from the Cliff brothers of the Frodingham Iron and Steel Company.

The foundation stone was laid in August 1903. The first librarian was E. Davison. It was in this building, too, that Harold Dudley established the first Scunthorpe museum in 1909.  [from the article by David Lambourne – see link below

Current status: Demolished in 1985

  • Year grant given (if known):
  • Amount of grant:
  • Year opened (and by who – if known): February 1904, by Joseph Cliff

Old photo of library (postcard):

Nothing in my collection yet

Web links:

Advertisements

Stamford library

Brief description

An unusual looking building – as described on the listings register: One storey in ashlar. Portico with 4 Tuscan columns, originally open between the columns. Very wide modillion eaves cornice in wood. Moulded pediment surmounts the whole frontage.

This is probably because, unlike other buildings which Carnegie funded, Stamford decided not to build new, but to reuse an existing building.

“Stamford Corporation purchased the White Lion Inn in High Street in 1801. This was knocked down and a market and shambles by William Legg was built on the site and opened in 1808. After the Public Libraries’ Act was adopted in 1903, the building was converted to a library, with a librarian’s cottage behind.”
[last paragraph is from the article by David Lambourne – see link below]

Awarded Grade II listing in 1954

Current status: Still open as a public library, run by Better (Lincolnshire have contracted out their libraries and they are now run by the CIC formerly known as GLL) (2016)

  • Year grant given (if known):
  • Amount of grant: £2,500
  • Year opened (and by who – if known): 25 Jan 1906 by Earl Brownlow

Photo of library today (2010):

Stamford2-tricia-800

Photo credit: Tricia Watson

Details:

P1150443-forblog

Library postcard:

stamford

Visited?

Yes, during a tour to visit several libraries in Lincolnshire in February 2018. Lovely and bright inside, especially the children’s library, which has colourful shelf-top decorations inspired by the Stamford tapestry – which is displayed in the museum attached to the library

Web links:

Lincoln library

Brief description

In general, the communities that applied for a grant to help fund a public library were those in which there was no free library. However, on occasions, an application was made in a place where a library already existed. Such was the case with Lincoln which secured the very large grant of £10,000.

The City had adopted the Public Libraries’ Act and had established a library in the old Assembly Rooms over the Butter Market in Silver Street in 1894. By the following year the library had some 7,000 books as well as news and reading rooms.

In the early years of the 20th Century it was decided that a larger library with open access and a much simpler borrowing system was needed, so an application for funds was made to Andrew Carnegie.

The new library, which remains as the public library in Lincoln, was built in Free School Lane to a design by Sir Reginald Blomfield, who also designed the Usher Gallery. Dr. T.E. Page, a distinguished Lincoln classics scholar, opened the library. A large stone plaque in a meeting room adjacent to the children’s library reads: ‘This building owes its erection in 1913 to the munificence of Andrew Carnegie’
[from the article by David Lambourne – see link below]

P1150489-forblog

It was awarded Grade II listing in 1969. [nb. listing says it is a 1914 building – presumably as that is when it opened]

Current status: Still open as a public library, run by Better (Lincolnshire have contracted out their libraries and they are now run by the CIC formerly known as GLL)  (2018)

  • Year grant given (if known):
  • Amount of grant: £10,000
  • Year opened (and by who – if known): 24 February 1914 by Dr TE Page

Photo of library today (2018):

P1150523-forblog

Details:

P1150483-forblog

Trowel used by Mrs CW Pennell in laying the foundation stone on 18 December 1912

Old photo of library (postcard):

Nothing in my collection yet

Visited?

Yes, in February 2018. We ran a workshop in the freshly decorated meeting room – the former reading room which is in the wing to the left of the main entrance hall.

Web links:

Gainsborough library

Brief description

In 1902 Councillor Joseph Barlow, Chairman of the Urban District Council, in wishing to commemorate the accession of Edward VII, wrote to Andrew Carnegie for assistance.

Carnegie offered £4,000 providing his usual conditions relating to the site and the Libraries’ Act were met. Sir Hickman Bacon offered a site and James Marshall approached employers in the town to raise the money to purchase it. Marshall’s own firm gave £200 and a promise to make up any shortfall.

The new library was opened in October 1905, was administered by the Urban District Council and initially held 1,800 books for lending with a further 80 on reference.

The building is still in use as a public library and stands opposite Gainsborough Old Hall. Although the exterior of the building has memorials to prominent people associated with the town over the centuries, there is no acknowledgement of Andrew Carnegie. He merely provided the money! Over the entrance are simply the words ‘Public Library’. [from the article by David Lambourne – see link below]

Awarded Grade II listing in 2015.

Current status: Still open as a public library, run by Better (Lincolnshire have contracted out their libraries and they are now run by the CIC formerly known as GLL) (2016)

  • Year grant given (if known): 1902
  • Amount of grant: £4,000
  • Year opened (and by who – if known): October 1905

Photo of library today (2011):

photo-gainsbrough

Details:

Old photo of library (postcard):

gainsborough

Visited?

Visited during a holiday in 2011.

Web links:

Ilkley library

Brief description

The building is half Town Hall, half library. The council announced a competition for the design of the buildings in November 1903 and over 60 entries were submitted before the drawings of Mr William Bakewell, of Park Square in Leeds were approved.  The foundation stone of the library was laid by John Dixon on 31st January 1906. The library committee wanted an impressive opening ceremony and invited the Reverend Robert Collyer. He had grown up in Ilkley, but had travelled to the United States in 1850, where he subsequently became a world famous preacher.

Awarded Grade II listing in 1976.

Current status: Still open as a public library, run by City of Bradford MDC. (2016)

  • Year grant given (if known): 1903
  • Amount of grant: £3,000
  • Year opened (and by who – if known):Opened on 2 october 1907 by Reverend Dr Robert Collyer, despite the full building not being finished until 1908 (they had invited him thinking it would be ready…..)

Photo of library today (2011):

ilkley-forblog

Details:

Ilkley-plaque-800

Ilkleyfoundationstone-800

Foundation stone – or, to be more accurate, metal plaque attached to foundation stone!

Old photo of library (postcard):

Nothing in my collection yet

Visited?

Yes, we visited during a holiday in Yorkshire. I love the art nouveau style figures by the door.

Web links:

Barrow library

Brief description

Designed and built 1915-22  by JA Charles, in Beaux-Arts Classical style. 1915 is carved into the building, but it wasn’t opened until 1922 after a lapse in building during WWI. The lecture room was converted to museum c1930.

Awarded Grade II listing in 1976.

Current status: Still open as a public library, run by Cumbria County Council (2016)

  • Year grant given (if known):
  • Amount of grant:
  • Year opened (and by who – if known): 1922

Photo of library in 2016:

barrow-small

Photo credit: Kathy Settle

Details:

Old[-ish] photo of library (postcard):

barrowinfurness

Visited?

I haven’t visited yet, but my colleague did in August 2016.

Web links:

Dalton library

Brief description

Councillors approved that the library should be built in Dalton-in-Furness at a meeting in May 1903. The estimated cost was £2,800.

It was given Grade II listed status in 1993.

Current status: A public library, run by Cumbria county council, until later in 2016, when library services are due to relocate to Dalton Community centre

  • Year grant given (if known): 1903
  • Amount of grant: £2,800
  • Year opened (and by who – if known): Building is dated 1903, but I’ve seen passing references to it being opened in 1905 [unconfirmed].

Photo of library in 2016:

IMAG1496-small

Photo credit: Kathy Settle

Details:

IMAG1497

Photo credit: Kathy Settle

Old photo of library (postcard):

Nothing in my collection yet

Visited?

I haven’t visited, but my colleague has, in August 2016, shortly before the library service was due to relocate.

Web links: