Plymouth library

Brief description

Architects were Thornely and Rooke. On Wednesday 16 October 1907 the two foundation stones for Plymouth’s new Free Public Library and the Museum and Art Gallery were laid on a site on Tavistock Road (now North Hill). It was opened in 1910 in a dual ceremony with the City of Plymouth Museum and Art Gallery.

Damaged during the Blitz and subsequently restored.

Awarded Grade II listing in 1975

Current status: Closed as a public library, when a new one was created in a former commercial building in the centre of the city. Plans are to refurbish and reopen as a history centre. (2017)

    • Year grant given (if known):
    • Amount of grant:
    • Year opened (and by who – if known): 1910

 

Photo of library today (2014):

geograph-4493939-by-N-Chadwick

Photo © N Chadwick (cc-by-sa/2.0)

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Old photo of library (postcard):

plymouth

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Halliwell library

Brief description

Architects: Henderson and Brown

Current status: Currently UCAN community centre (2017) “Providing resources and services to the residents of Bolton. Our facilities include library collection service, free internet access and use of free phone to contact Council services, utility companies and other agencies.”

  • Year grant given (if known):
  • Amount of grant:
  • Year opened (and by who – if known): 29 September 1910 by Andrew Carnegie

Photo of library today (2012):

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Photo credit: Terry Whalebone (flickr – used with permission)

Details:

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Photo credit: Terry Whalebone (flickr – used with permission)

Old photo of library (postcard):

Nothing in my collection yet

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Astley Bridge library

Brief description

Architects were Bradshaw, Gass and Hope (who were also responsible for Bolton central, and Great Lever libraries – the latter was also a Carnegie library).

Current status: Closed as a public library in 2012. Currently used as offices by mail room equipment supplier Franking Sense. (2017)

  • Year grant given (if known):
  • Amount of grant:
  • Year opened (and by who – if known): 1910

Photo of library today (2012):

geograph-3075260-by-Alan-Murray-Rust

© Copyright Alan Murray-Rust and licensed for reuse under this Creative Commons Licence

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Old photo of library (postcard):

Nothing in my collection yet

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Nelson library

Brief description

Architects: J R Poyser and W B Savidge. From the listing: “an exuberant expression of Grand-Manner Baroque, with high quality carved stone detailing”. This library was designed as a closed access library in which books were selected through review of a catalogue and then retrieved by staff for the reader. It switched to an open access system in 1925 which permitted borrowers to browse the books.

Awarded Grade II listing in 2017

Current status: No longer a public library, it was closed in 1974. Used for a while as Pendle council offices, it was refurbished and put up for sale in 2013. From article below, it was sold in 2016 and is now houses a solicitors practice.

  • Year grant given (if known):
  • Amount of grant: £7,000
  • Year opened (and by who – if known): 1906

Photo of library today (2013):

geograph-2568359-by-robert-wade

© Copyright robert wade and licensed for reuse under this Creative Commons Licence

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Old photo of library (postcard – from my collection):

nelson

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Skipton library

Brief description

Site given by the trustees of Skipton Mechanics Institute.Architects were John William Broughton and James Hartley.

From article (link below): In 1903, Skipton Urban District Council and the trustees and council of the Science and Art Schools formally wrote to Mr Carnegie asking for £6,000 (around £600,000 in today’s money).

They were granted £3,000, but the conditions were that a penny rate would have to be levied for the purchase of books, as well as extra funds raised to liquidate the mortgage on the two shops which stood on the proposed site. The first librarian, Leonard Hetherington, was also appointed from a field of 170 applicants.

The cost of the building itself was £3,000 while the furnishings cost £450, to be paid for from local rates.

Current status: Still open as a public library, run by North Yorkshire council (2017)

  • Year grant given (if known): 1906
  • Amount of grant: £3,000
  • Year opened (and by who – if known): Sir Matthew Amcotts Wilson Bart on 16 February 1910.

Photo of library today (2008):

geograph-824916-by-Peter-Church

Photo credit: Peter Church and licensed for reuse under this Creative Commons Licence

Details:

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Photo credit: Kathy Settle (2017)

Old photo of library (postcard):

Nothing in my collection yet

Visited?

Not yet

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Withington library

Brief description

On 13th October 1911, a library service was set up by the City Council in a house on the site of the present building. This had a stock of 1,861 books, as well as a newsroom. It soon became clear that a more substantial service in a purpose-built building was required. The present building was designed by Henry Price, a council architect who also designed Didsbury and Chorlton libraries.

Withington library was one of the first in Manchester to have a young people’s reading room.

Current status: Still open as a public library, run by Manchester city council (2017)

  • Year grant given (if known):
  • Amount of grant: Partly financed by the Carnegie UK Trust: £5,000 from a total cost of £15,500
  • Year opened (and by who – if known): 30 May 1927, by the Earl of Elgin and Kincardine (Treasurer of the Carnegie UK Trust and President of the Library Association)

Photo of library today (2017):

geograph-5478958-by-Gerald-England-withington 

© Copyright Gerald England and licensed for reuse under this Creative Commons Licence

Details:

Old photo of library (postcard):

Nothing in my collection yet

Visited?

Not yet

Web links: