Hull (West Park) library

Brief description

The building was designed by JH Hirst, City Architect, in a half-timbered domestic revival style.

It served as a public library until 2003.

Awarded Grade II listing in 1994

Current status: Reopened as the Carnegie Heritage Centre, with a focus on local history in 2008. The East Yorkshire Family History Society is also based there. (2017)

  • Year grant given (if known):
  • Amount of grant: £3,000
  • Year opened (and by who – if known): 18 April 1905, by Sir James Reckitt, Bart, JP

Photo of library today (2017):

hull

Details:

hull-plaque

Old photo of library (postcard):

hull-west-park

Visited?

In June 2017. The centre was closed, but members of the team who run the Bindery were around, and invited me inside to take a look. Its a gem of a building in arts and crafts style – lots of original features remain, including mosaic, stained glass, fireplaces, furniture, and tiles.

Web links:

Ilkley library

Brief description

The building is half Town Hall, half library. The council announced a competition for the design of the buildings in November 1903 and over 60 entries were submitted before the drawings of Mr William Bakewell, of Park Square in Leeds were approved.  The foundation stone of the library was laid by John Dixon on 31st January 1906. The library committee wanted an impressive opening ceremony and invited the Reverend Robert Collyer. He had grown up in Ilkley, but had travelled to the United States in 1850, where he subsequently became a world famous preacher.

Awarded Grade II listing in 1976.

Current status: Still open as a public library, run by City of Bradford MDC. (2016)

  • Year grant given (if known): 1903
  • Amount of grant: £3,000
  • Year opened (and by who – if known):Opened on 2 october 1907 by Reverend Dr Robert Collyer, despite the full building not being finished until 1908 (they had invited him thinking it would be ready…..)

Photo of library today (2011):

ilkley-forblog

Details:

Ilkley-plaque-800

Ilkleyfoundationstone-800

Foundation stone – or, to be more accurate, metal plaque attached to foundation stone!

Old photo of library (postcard):

Nothing in my collection yet

Visited?

Yes, we visited during a holiday in Yorkshire. I love the art nouveau style figures by the door.

Web links:

Shipley library

Brief description

Current status: No longer a library. When we saw it in 2011 (see below) it looked very sad. Apparently there had been many plans since it closed, but none had come to fruition. The most recent was a plan to incorporate the building into a new development. See below for link, the plan was: “the relocation of historic Carnegie Library, which will be transported, stone by stone, from its current location and converted into six residential apartments.” Update (Sept 2016) – as the new article linked below states, the relocation plan has fallen through and the owner is reconsidering. The building has at least been tidied up and trees removed.

  • Year grant given (if known):
  • Amount of grant: £3,000
  • Year opened (and by who – if known): 1905

Photo of library today [in 2011]:

5538069759_e2da4bf938_z (1)

Old photo of library (postcard):

Not yet in my collection

Visited?

Drove past in 2011

Web links:

Keighley library

Brief description

The first public library in England to be funded by Andrew Carnegie, the foundation stone was laid by Sir Hugo Swire, on the day of King Edward VII’s coronation: 9 August 1902.

Design of the library was open to competition, and the one by McKewan and Swan of Birmingham was chosen. Both were young architects: Arthur McKewan was 30 in 1901, and James Arthur Swan was 27, and studied the Arts and Crafts movement and ideas.

RS Crossley was appointed chief librarian when the building opened in 1904.

An extension was added in 1961. The building was fully refurbished in 2007, with many original features restored. It was given Grade II listing in 1986.

Current status: still a public library, operated by City of Bradford MDC

  • Year grant given (if known):
  • Amount of grant: £10,000
  • Year opened (and by who – if known): 20 August 1904, by the Duke of Devonshire

Photo of library today:

5538070067_aa9300bfaa_z

Details:

Keighley-stone

Foundation stone

Keighley-plaque

Bronze plaque commemorating the opening

Keighley-bust

Stone bust of Carnegie just inside the entrance.

Old photo of library (postcard):

keighley

Visited?

Visited during a holiday in Yorkshire in 2011

Web links:

York library

Brief description

In 1913 the Library Committee had been considering that the building was inadequate and approaches were made to the Carnegie United Kingdom Trust. After preliminary negotiations, a formal request was made to the Trust in 1915, and following investigations, an offer of £12,000 was made on 29 February 1916. The Trust added, however, that any building work should not commence until after the war.

A site had been acquired in Museum Street, and the architects Brierley and Rutherford were employed to design the building. When work commenced after the war, the Carnegie United Kingdom Trust revised its offer to £13,200, however even then a loan was needed to complete the project. The first portion of the building, containing the central block and one wing, was officially opened by the Earl of Elgin, and the total cost was £24,500.

In 1934 a further portion of the building was erected, before the building was finally completed in 1938. The completed building was opened by Sir John A R Marriott MA on 26 October 1938.

Further extended in 2015 thanks to National Lottery funding, the building now also houses the city archives.

Current status? Still a public library, managed by York Explore (2017).

  • Year grant given (if known): 1916
  • Amount of grant: £13,200
  • Year opened (and by who – if known): 23 September 1927, by the Earl of Elgin and Kincardine, chair of the Carnegie UK Trust.

Photo of library today:

york5-central-forblog

Details:

yorkplaque-forblog

Plaque in the library entrance

Old photo of library (postcard):

Visited?

I’ve visited this library several times: first while on holiday in 2011, then more recently a couple of times for Libraries Taskforce meetings.

Web links: