Worksop library

Brief description

The architects were: Haslam Son & Hollely (Gazetter of Public libraries) or Haslam, Son Holley (in the Historic England listing).

The Carnegie UK trust appears to have made several investments in this area. A suggestion made by a Worksop librarian to the trustees formed the basis of the idea of establishing one central depot for books to be supplied to villages in rural areas to reduce costs. In 1916 the trustees granted £800 to circulate books from Worksop to villages within a 10 mile radius.

In 1928 the library changed its name to Worksop Library and Museum but in 1932 the disastrous Worksop flood caused damage to the museum and it had to close. A new museum and library opened on Memorial Avenue in 1938 – where it stayed until 2010.

No mention in that article that the Trust had anything to do with the new library, but another article (about Canch Park) describes: …. the old Carnegie Library building, currently occupied by the Aurora Wellbeing Charity.

“This former Central Library and Museum, with its rotunda dome, now houses the premises of a well-being and cancer-related therapies charity, a teashop and a charity shop. The Carnegie Foundation-sponsored building by Hallam, Son Holley (sic), was opened in 1938 and closed in 2010”. [from geograph photo caption]

Awarded Grade II listing in 1990

Current status: No longer a public library, see above (2017)

  • Year grant given (if known):
  • Amount of grant:
  • Year opened (and by who – if known): 1938

Photo of library today (2016):

geograph-5110481-by-David-Hallam-Jones

© Copyright David Hallam-Jones and licensed for reuse under this Creative Commons Licence

Details:

Old photo of library (postcard):

Nothing in my collection yet

Visited?

Not yet

Web links:

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Bulwell library

Brief description

The grant was given by the Carnegie UK Trust. Over the main entrance is the inscription: Nottingham public libraries Northern branch. The architects were Bright and Thoms.

Current status: Reopened as a dance school in 2013. Take 5 Theatre School of Dancing still occupy the building. (2017)

  • Year grant given (if known):
  • Amount of grant:
  • Year opened (and by who – if known): 1923

Photo of library today (2009):

bulwell-notts-geograph

Photo credit:Alan Murray-Rust and licensed for reuse under this Creative Commons Licence

Old photo of library (postcard):

Nothing in my collection yet

Visited?

Not yet

Web links:

Stapleford library

Brief description

A grant from the Carnegie Trust allowed for a Carnegie Free Library to be built in what was then Towle Avenue, Stapleford in 1906. As the site had previously been part of the grounds of Stapleford Hall, owned by the Borlasse-Warren family Towle Avenue was later renamed Warren Avenue.

Current status: Used as a public library until replacement by modern premises in 1981. Then fell into disrepair until purchased by Stapleford Town Council in 1987 and subsequently renovated and re-opened in 1988 as The Carnegie Centre. Now home to Stapleford Town Council. nb in 2013, while Stapleford library was refurbished, library service were briefly offered from the Carnegie centre once more. (2017)

  • Year grant given (if known):
  • Amount of grant:
  • Year opened (and by who – if known): 1906

Photo of library today (2008):

stapleford-geographPhoto credit: Oxymoron and licensed for reuse under this Creative Commons Licence

Old photo of library (postcard):

Nothing in my collection yet

Visited?

Not yet

Web links:

Mansfield library

Brief description

The foundation stone was laid by Mrs AB Markham on 6 July 1904. Land for the library was donated by the Duke of Portland.

Awarded Grade II listing in 1994

Current status: Converted in 1975 and became the Mansfield arts centre (2017)

  • Year grant given (if known):
  • Amount of grant:
  • Year opened (and by who – if known): 1905

Photo of library today:

no free-to-use photos identified yet. Note that in this one on flickr, it appears a whole new storey was added at some point.

Details:

Old photo of library (postcard):

mansfield

Visited?

Not yet

Web links:

Huthwaite library

Brief description

Construction started in 1912 (a stone tablet on the building records this). The architect was Ernest W Bostock, and the builders were Vallance and Blythe of Mansfield. Refurbished in 2004.

Current status: Still open as a public library, run by Inspire, on behalf of Nottinghamshire county council (2016)

  • Year grant given (if known):
  • Amount of grant:
  • Year opened (and by who – if known): 12 April 1913, by Alderman Robert Mellors CC

Photo of library today (2014):

geograph-4034873-by-jthomas

Huthwaite library, © Copyright JThomas and licensed for reuse under this Creative Commons Licence

Details:

Old photo of library (postcard):

Nothing in my collection yet

Visited?

Not yet

Web links:

  • Article on the library’s centenary celebrations
  • Article about the library – Huthwaite online: contains lots of images of the library. A later article on the same site has post-refurbishment photos.

Carlton library

Brief description

The architect was JC Haller.

Current status: Still open as a public library, run by Inspire, on behalf of Nottinghamshire County Council (2016)

  • Year grant given (if known):
  • Amount of grant:
  • Year opened (and by who – if known): 1906

Photo of library today (2007):

carlton_free_library_-_geograph-org-uk_-_312705

Alan Murray-Rust [CC licence], via Wikimedia Commons

Details:

Old photo of library (postcard):

carlton

Visited?

Not yet

Web links:

Arnold library

Brief description

The architect was a local Arnold man, William Henry Higginbottom, who designed many of the other big buildings in the town, such as the Empress cinema and Church Drive school.

Current status: Demolished in 1981.

  • Year grant given (if known):
  • Amount of grant:
  • Year opened (and by who – if known): 1906

Old photo of library (postcard):

arnold

Web links:

  • Photo of the interior of the library, on Picture the Past – taken by Arnold Camera Club
  • Photo of the opening ceremony, on Picture the Past