Milnrow library

Brief description

Designed in 1907 by architects’ practice S Butterworth and WH Duncan of Rochdale (who also designed 5 other libraries, including Littleborough, Wardle, and Clitheroe). The listing states that the architects “successfully combined an eclectic mix of Arts and Crafts and Art Nouveau with a touch of Mannerism in the attenuated entrance gable to produce a well-balanced and pleasing composition, enhanced by the use of high-quality materials and craftsmanship in the relief lettering and intricate ornamentation, and the leaded and stained Art Nouveau glass.”

Awarded Grade II listing in 2012

Current status: Still open as a public library, run by Rochdale borough council (2017)

  • Year grant given (if known): 1902
  • Amount of grant: £2500
  • Year opened (and by who – if known): 4 July 1908

Photo of library today (2010):

geograph-1917068-by-david-dixon

From Geograph© Copyright David Dixon and licensed for reuse under this Creative Commons Licence

Details:

Old photo of library (postcard):

Nothing in my collection yet

Visited?

Not yet

Web links:

Rawtenstall library

Brief description

Plans for the new library were drawn up in 1903, after the Carnegie grant was secured. The designers chosen were Messrs Crouch, Butler and Savage of Birmingham (who later won competitions to design Carnegie libraries in Worthing and Wednesbury). The foundation stone was laid on 15 September 1904.

Rawtenstall Library was opened in 1906 and the official opening in 1907 was attended by Andrew Carnegie. The library was designed as part of a larger civic complex for the town, including Town Hall and Assembly Room, but it was never completed. It was one of the first public libraries in the country to open with open-access to the books on the shelves.

It was extended in 1914, this was also paid for by Carnegie. The library was operated by Rawtenstall Borough until 1974. Refurbished in 2003.

Awarded Grade II listing in 1971

Current status: Still open as a public library, run by Lancashire County Council (2021)

  • Year grant given (if known): 11 July 1902
  • Amount of grant: £6,000 (additional £921 awarded in 1908)
  • Year opened (and by who – if known): 1 June 1907, by Andrew Carnegie (nb this was the official opening ceremony – the library had opened to the public on 30 June 1906)

Photo of the library in 2020:

Photo credit: Oriel Prizeman 2020. Image shared under CC license CC-BY-NC-SA 4.0 Cardiff University AHR ShelfLife project

Photo of (back of) the library in 2010:

4714892653_11926d9b75_z

Photo credit: flickr user Tim Green (shared under cc licence)

Details:

Old photo of library (postcard):

rawtenstall

Visited?

Not yet

Web links:

Oswaldtwistle library

Brief description

Oswaldtwistle library was built on the site of an old public house. The architect was F Quentery Farmer.

During 1981 and 1982 it temporarily moved into Oswaldtwistle Town Hall whilst emergency repairs and refurbishment were carried out.

Current status: In 2016, Oswaldtwistle was one of many libraries affected by Lancashire council’s budget cuts. The library was passed to the Oswaldtwistle Community Lamp Group who planned to reinvent the Carnegie building as a hybrid library which would divide between being a lending library and a ‘book cycle’ – effectively a donation-led book shop. Following local elections, the new council decided to reverse the decision made by their predecessors, and reopen many of the libraries that had been closed. Owsaldtwistle was one of these, and reopened in January 2018. News item below doesn’t mention if the community group are still involved in any way.

  • Year grant given (if known):
  • Amount of grant:
  • Year opened (and by who – if known): 1915 (30 October?), by Councillor A Hargreaves on behalf of the Urban District Council

Photo of library today (2009):

oswaldtwistle-fromflickr

Photo credit: flickr user Robert Wade (shared under cc licence)

Details:

Old photo of library (postcard):

Nothing in my collection yet

Visited?

Not yet

Web links:

Chadderton library

Brief description

Designed by Arthur R Grant and James Lindsay Grant of Manchester in the Jacobean Revival style, for Chadderton UDC. Built during 1904-5, shortly after the construction of the neighbouring police station and the first public baths, these buildings being the town’s earliest purpose built civic buildings, forming the original core of the town.

The building was altered during the 1950s, losing a cupola, flagpole and part of the parapet to the tower above the entrance.

Awarded Grade II listing in 2011.

Current status: Remained in use as a public library until 2010. It was sold in 2011 and bought by Community Skills Development Agency (CSDA) who planned to turn it into a training centre. (2016)

  • Year grant given (if known):
  • Amount of grant:
  • Year opened (and by who – if known): 1905

Photo of library today (2014):

15831640088_66c2cdc6b3_z

Photo credit: flickr user Jeremy Sutcliffe, shared under cc licence

Details:

Old photo of library (postcard):

Nothing in my collection yet

Visited?

Not yet

Web links:

Farnworth library

Brief description

Designed by Bradshaw and Gass, architects, of Bolton for the Farnworth Urban District Council. The library forms a part of an ensemble of public buildings all designed by Bradshaw and Gass, and intended to form the civic focus of the newly-created Urban District Council of Farnworth. The group includes the Town Hall and the Baptist Church. [from the listing record]

The carved heads above the door are Mr A Topp JP who donated the site, and Andrew Carnegie.

Awarded Grade II listing in 1999.

Current status: Still open as a public library, run by Bolton council (2016)

  • Year grant given (if known):
  • Amount of grant:
  • Year opened (and by who – if known): 10 April 1911

Photo of library today (2012):

geograph-2880080-by-dave-bevis

Farnworth library, © Copyright Dave Bevis and licensed for reuse under this Creative Commons Licence

Details:

Old photo of library (postcard):

farnworth

Visited?

Not yet

Web links:

Accrington library

Brief description

The library was designed and built by the borough engineer: William J Newton. One of the original features was a stained glass window by H Gustave Hiller of Liverpool. Mr John Edgar Stansfield had given a bequest of £500 when the council adopted the Public Library act, in 1899. The main funding was then provided by Carnegie.

Awarded Grade II listing in 1984

Current status: Still open as a public library, run by Lancashire county council (2016)

  • Year grant given (if known): 1904
  • Amount of grant: Initially £7,500, later increased to £10,000
  • Year opened (and by who – if known): 18 January 1908, by Alderman TE Higham

Photo of library today (2008):

library_-_geograph-org-uk_-_1000801

robert wade [CC BY-SA 2.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0)%5D, via Wikimedia Commons

Details:

Old photo of library (postcard):

accrington

Visited?

Not yet

Web links:

Lister Drive library

Brief description

Also known as West Derby library, and its in Tuebrook. Designed by Liverpool city surveyor Thomas Shelmerdine, in ‘Free Renaissance’ style. The chief librarian was Peter Cowell.

Awarded Grade II listing in 1985.

Current status: Closed as a library in 2006. Sold by the council in 2011, and eventually bought by  a charity which provides services to young people. There are plans to restore and refurbish it,  and they hope to reopen in 2018. (2016) Update: restoration continues – the building will be opened as part of Heritage Open days 2019 – for a hard hat tour.

  • Year grant given (if known):
  • Amount of grant: c£13,000
  • Year opened (and by who – if known): 27 June 1905 by Sir William Forwood JP

Photo of library in 2003:

carnegie_library_-_geograph-org-uk_-_523673

stan benbow [CC BY-SA 2.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0)%5D, via Wikimedia Commons

Details:

Old photo of library (postcard):

Nothing in my collection yet. But this gallery on the Liverpool Echo site contains lots of images of the old library. And this blog post also contains lots of photos.

Visited?

Not yet.

Web links:

Walton library

Brief description

The architect was Arnold Thornely.

Current status: Now known as Walton library (Life Rooms) – owned and managed by Merseycare NHS. (2016)

  • Year grant given (if known):
  • Amount of grant: £8,000
  • Year opened (and by who – if known): 23 November 1911 by Richard Caton who was Deputy Chair of Liverpool’s Library, Museum and Arts Committee

Photo of library in 2013:

15302085879_8626fded17_z

Photo credit: Flickr user SteHLiverpool (cc licence)

Old photo of library (postcard):

Nothing in my collection yet

Visited?

Not yet

Web links: