Crewton library, Derby

Brief description

The library once stood at the front of Alvaston Park was for several years supported by wooden beams as it lay empty and was finally demolished in 1968 owing to subsidence. Web ref – Alvaston and Crewton then and now). The same site then later has reference to Alvaston Library, Crewton, Derby, and says it was Alvaston library was founded in 1913 by the Carnegie UK Trust. Designed by Arthur Eaton and was completed in 1916 but did not
actually open until January 1920. In 1972 it ceased to be a library and was used as a store for Derby museum until it was demolished in 1978.

Another reference claims it opened in 1915, was closed to the public in 1971 and finally demolished in 1980

Nb I’ve also traced references to Alvaston library (in the Gazeteer of Historic Public Library Buildings). This references it as funded by the Carnegie UK Trust, architect Arthur Easton. Opened 1916, demolished 1978.

Current status: Demolished in 1968 – or 1980.

  • Year grant given (if known):
  • Amount of grant:
  • Year opened (and by who – if known): 1915, 1916, or 1920

Old photo of library (postcard):

Nothing in my collection yet – although I have seen an old postcard, which refs to it as Crewton library

Web links:

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Pear Tree library, Derby

Brief description

Built in 1913, the architect was CB Sherwin. The interior of the building was gutted and refurbished in the early 1980’s but retains some of the original features.

Current status: Still open as a public library, run by Derby City Council (2017)

  • Year grant given (if known):
  • Amount of grant:
  • Year opened (and by who – if known): 1916

Photo of library today (2017):

peartree-derby-forblog

Old photo of library (postcard):

Nothing in my collection yet

Visited?

Yes, during our holiday in the Peak District in August 2017. We briefly popped into Derby to meet a train, but unfortunately as it was Sunday, the library was closed.

Web links:

Swadlincote library

Brief description

Built 1907 on Alexandra Road.  Demolished in the 1960s “a victim of mining subsidence”. Houses now stand on that site.

  • Year grant given (if known):
  • Amount of grant:
  • Year opened (and by who – if known): 1908

Old photo of library (postcard):

Nothing in my collection yet

Web links:

Staveley library

Brief description

Library funded by the Carnegie UK Trust.

Current status: Still open as a public library, run by Derbyshire libraries (2017)

  • Year grant given (if known):
  • Amount of grant:
  • Year opened (and by who – if known): 1932

Photo of library today (2015):

staveley-derbyshire-flickr

Photo credit: Derbyshire libraries (shared under cc licence)

Details:

Old photo of library (postcard):

Nothing in my collection yet

Visited?

Not yet

Web links:

New Mills library

Brief description

Mr Henry Barber then chairman of the Libraries Committee gave the site, which was next to the Town Hall.

Current status: Still open as a public library, run by Derbyshire libraries (2017)

  • Year grant given (if known):
  • Amount of grant: £2,000
  • Year opened (and by who – if known): 25 June 1910,

Photo of library today (2016):

30511481804_ae1e274888_z

Photo credit: Derbyshire libraries (shared under cc licence)

Details:

Old photo of library (postcard):

Nothing in my collection yet

Visited?

Not yet

Web links:

Long Eaton

Brief description

Designed by 1906, by architects Gorman and Ross of Long Eaton and built by Messrs J & J Warner of Mickleover.  Above the entrance is a “mosaiced tympanum with the figure of Learning set against a golden sunburst.”

LongEaton3-forblog

The library also has a large stained glass window by Stoddart of Nottingham.

LongEaton2-forblog
The children’s library was added in 1954, and the building was further extended in 1966, with the addition of the Stevenson Gallery, then reopened after refurbishment in 2005

Awarded Grade II listing in 1986. To east of the main entrance is a pair of free-standing iron gates, all that now remains of the original Art Nouveau railings that encircled the library. These are also included in the listing.

Current status: Still open as a public library, run by Derbyshire county council (2017)

  • Year grant given (if known): 1902
  • Amount of grant: £3,000. Note: the Carnegie Trust gave a further grant of £350 in 1931 for book purchase.
  • Year opened (and by who – if known): 23 June 1906, by Lord Fitzmaurice

I read the booklet ‘Memorial of the Inauguration’ – which contained a step by step account of the first decision to build a library – including listing the many towns people who pledged funds. The first sod was dug on 11 March 1905 by Mr Enoch Wallis. Sir Walter Foster MP laid the foundation stone on 3 June 1905, accompanied by a choir of 100 school children.

Photo of library today:

long-eaton-from-kathaitken

Image credit: Richard Belton (former library manager) – and thanks to Kath Aitken, who shared it.

Details:

LongEaton-forblog

With many thanks to the team in the library who helped me find information about the founding of this library – and also bought the plaque out from a storeroom (where it had been placed after someone tried to steal it from the front).

Old photo of library (postcard):

longeaton

Visited?

Yes, in August 2017 on our way home from a holiday in the Peak District. The library was open and busy with children doing craft. I found information about the early days of this, and the other library Carnegie funded nearby, in Ilkeston. Apparently he was unable to visit either when they were opened, but went to Ilkeston later in 1905 where he was made a Freeman of the borough, and presented with an illuminated scroll of thanks from the people of Long Eaton.

Web links:

Ilkeston library

Brief description

The library occupies most of the southern end of the Market Place. It was designed by Hunter and Woodhouse of Belper, in the Edwardian ‘Free Style’.

Built nearly a hundred years ago, the library looks almost the same today, (apart from some unsafe pediments that have been removed,) as it did all those years ago. A library for the town had first been suggested as far back as 1879 but it was not until the gift from Carnegie, that the library became a reality. The stone panel above the entrance bears the words “Carnegie Free Library”. In 1904, readers selected their books from lists and it was not until 1922 that they were allowed to browse the shelves themselves.

Awarded Grade II listing in 1986.

Current status: Still open as a public library, run by Derbyshire county council (2016)

  • Year grant given (if known):
  • Amount of grant: £7,500
  • Year opened (and by who – if known): 1904

Photo of library today (2013):

geograph-3302653-by-david-hallam-jones

Ilkeston library, © Copyright David Hallam-Jones and licensed for reuse under this Creative Commons Licence

Details:

Old photo of library (postcard):

ilkeston

Visited?

Not yet

Web links: