Cockermouth library

Brief description

Built by the local firm of Walker Brothers, who used pink sandstone from Roundclose Quarry at Morseby.

Current status: Still open as a public library, although responsibility for who runs it is in transition. See below for link to the proposal put forward regarding a community asset transfer. They would still run library services from the library, but would also create a hub of public services to benefit residents, businesses and visitors. (2017)

  • Year grant given (if known):
  • Amount of grant:
  • Year opened (and by who – if known): 1905

Photo of library today (2004):

cockermouth-geograph

Photo credit: Humphrey Bolton and licensed for reuse under this Creative Commons Licence

Old photo of library (postcard):

Nothing in my collection yet

Visited?

Not yet

Web links:

Also book ref: Mick Jane: Cockermouth’s “CARNEGIE, FREE LIBRARY” – Celebrating 100 years in 2004.

Askam library

Brief description

The architect was W Richardson. The site was donated by a local benefactor (the name Jack Challinor is mentioned in the Gazeteer of Public Library Buildings).

Current status: Still open as a public library, run by Cumbria libraries (2017)

  • Year grant given (if known):
  • Amount of grant: £500
  • Year opened (and by who – if known): 1905

Photo of library today:

No free to use photo identified yet.

Old photo of library (postcard):

Nothing in my collection yet

Visited?

Not yet

Web links:

Workington library

Brief description

Originally built as the public library and ajoining Carnegie lecture hall. The open competition attracted 74 entries and the winners were Messrs W.A Mellon and George Wittet (of York). Alderman R.E Highton formally laid the foundation stone for the new library on 10th September 1903. The contractor for the red sandstone building was Messrs J.I Wilson and Co.

From 1907 The Council Chamber (Now Monroe’s Bar) was located in the Carnegie Library and was used by the Borough Council for its meetings. The lecture hall became a picture house in the early days of cinema, and remained one until 1958.

Awarded Grade II listing in 1985

Current status: Closed in 1973, converted into the Carnegie arts centre and theatre. (2017)

  • Year grant given (if known):
  • Amount of grant: £7500
  • Year opened (and by who – if known): 6 October 1904 by Alderman Robert Ernest Highton JP

Photo of library today (2010):

geograph-2095965-by-rose-and-trev-cloughFrom Geograph© Copyright Rose and Trev Clough and licensed for reuse under this Creative Commons Licence

Details:

geograph-2095969-by-rose-and-trev-cloughFrom Geograph© Copyright Rose and Trev Clough and licensed for reuse under this Creative Commons Licence

Old photo of library (postcard):

workington

Visited?

Not yet

Web links:

Barrow library

Brief description

Designed and built 1915-22  by JA Charles, in Beaux-Arts Classical style. 1915 is carved into the building, but it wasn’t opened until 1922 after a lapse in building during WWI. The lecture room was converted to museum c1930.

Awarded Grade II listing in 1976.

Current status: Still open as a public library, run by Cumbria County Council (2016)

  • Year grant given (if known):
  • Amount of grant:
  • Year opened (and by who – if known): 1922

Photo of library in 2016:

barrow-small

Photo credit: Kathy Settle

Details:

Old[-ish] photo of library (postcard):

barrowinfurness

Visited?

I haven’t visited yet, but my colleague did in August 2016.

Web links:

Dalton library

Brief description

Councillors approved that the library should be built in Dalton-in-Furness at a meeting in May 1903. The estimated cost was £2,800.

It was given Grade II listed status in 1993.

Current status: A public library, run by Cumbria county council, until later in 2016, when library services are due to relocate to Dalton Community centre

  • Year grant given (if known): 1903
  • Amount of grant: £2,800
  • Year opened (and by who – if known): Building is dated 1903, but I’ve seen passing references to it being opened in 1905 [unconfirmed].

Photo of library in 2016:

IMAG1496-small

Photo credit: Kathy Settle

Details:

IMAG1497

Photo credit: Kathy Settle

Old photo of library (postcard):

Nothing in my collection yet

Visited?

I haven’t visited, but my colleague has, in August 2016, shortly before the library service was due to relocate.

Web links:

Kendal library

Brief description

The carnegie building replaced the old library in the market place. It was designed by Kendal architect T.F. Pennington and a cartouche on the front confirms it dates from 1908.

Current status: still a public library [2016], run by Cumbria county council

  • Year grant given (if known):
  • Amount of grant: £5,000
  • Year opened (and by who – if known): 20 March 1909 by the Mayor, Mr J Banks.

Photo of library today:

8905220717_618ccae249_z (1)

Details:

Old photo of library (postcard):

No postcard yet….. I’m definitely looking out for one!

Visited?

This is the library that forms my earliest library memories. We lived in Kendal from when I was about 2-10, and mum remembers taking me and my sister upstairs to the children’s library many times. I do remember a circular lobby where you could look down from the gallery as you went upstairs. Not very pushchair friendly though. I’ve been back once since it was refurbished – now there is another entrance around the side, so you can avoid the steps if you need to. The children’s library has also been moved downstairs.

Web links: