Stockport library

Brief description

The library was built in 1913-14 to designs by Bradshaw, Gass and Hope in the Edwardian Baroque style.

Initially, Carnegie offered Stockport Corporation £10,000 for the erection of a free central library. The design was put out to competition and Bradshaw & Gass submitted a design costing £14,000. The Carnegie assessor, Percy S Worthington, award the ‘premium’ to them in October 1910. As this was over budget, and Andrew Carnegie increased his offer to £15,000 on condition that the Corporation provided a further £2,000 to build a branch library in another part of the town.

Awarded Grade II listing in 2017

Current status: Still open as a public library, run by Stockport council (2017)

  • Year grant given (if known):
  • Amount of grant: £15,000
  • Year opened (and by who – if known): October 1913

Photo of library today (2015):

geograph-4589582-by-dave-bevis
Photo credit: Dave Bevis  on geograph, licensed for reuse under this Creative Commons Licence

Details:

Old photo of library (postcard):

Nothing in my collection yet

Visited?

Not yet

Web links:

 

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2 thoughts on “Stockport library”

  1. I have a photo of the Carnegie Library , Eccles . It is on a post card and the letter written on the back is dated May 2nd. 1924. The writer, my great aunt, writes that this part of Eccles has improved since Mother lived here.

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    1. Thanks Vicki. Looking at my entry for the library in Eccles, it says it was built on a slum clearance site. Good to hear a library was part of the regeneration plans – as is sometimes the case today too.

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